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Happy Book Birthday – Jivin’ Tango By Connie L. Smith

May 17, 2015

 Happy Book Birthday to Jivin’ Tango by fellow Inkspell author, Connie L. Smith.

Jivin' Tango.v3

Blurb:

Lila and Austin have known each other since she befriended his younger brother when she was a toddler. In fact, since her parents moved from her hometown, Lila’s lived with Austin’s family. The two are friends, though more of the teasing, taunting breed than the BFF variety.

But all it takes is one moment for everything to change…

For Austin, that moment comes when Lila performs a rumba in the school’s auditorium to qualify for the state dance competition, the young woman on stage so far-removed from the little girl in his memories.

For Lila, the moment is a reflected image of Austin preparing for prom, the guy standing in front of his mirror hardly resembling the child that spent so much of his youth pestering her.

Will they find a way to admit to themselves and their families that their feelings are deeper than friendship? And can Lila focus on this building relationship – and deal with her unstable ex – and still win the dance contest?

Excerpt:

Austin’s gorgeous, smart, funny, ambitious, and athletic.

But he’s certainly not a dancer.

I learn that early in our miniature lesson, though it doesn’t bother me. No aggravation surfaces on his face if he misses a step, and his laughter when he completely botches a move proves contagious. He’s terrible, we both know it, and it’s about the most fun I’ve had in years.

When he messes up a particularly simple step, I cackle so much, I let go of his fingers to hold my palms over my mouth. “How could you miss that?”

Without a bit of shame, he shrugs. “It’s actually pretty easy to do on my end.”

“Well, I can see why I never picked you for a dance partner.”

He snorts. “Yeah, Trent was definitely the right way to go with that one. Now.” He takes my hands in his, glances down at his poorly functioning feet, then focuses on my face. “What did I do wrong?”

I have to bite down on my bottom lip to keep my amusement from showing, but I manage. Barely. “You know how some people have two left feet?” I wait for him to nod before I let humor take over my features. “You seem to think you only have one foot, period.”

He scrunches his brow. “What do you mean?”

“That’s what you did wrong.” I take a step back and drop his hands, thinking an example would be the best way to explain the problem. “You went here.” I put my right foot in place. “Then here.” My left foot hardly budges. “Then here.” I move my right foot about ten inches. “You should’ve moved your left foot more. When you didn’t, it knocked your balance off.”

“Something that simple?”

I roll my eyes at the disbelief in his tone, then lace our fingers again. “Yeah. Something that simple. Every step’s important when you’re dancing.”

“Huh.” The song changes, and it’s another slow number, one I recognize from Trent’s oldies collection. Johnny Rivers, singing “Slow Dancing.” I’m tempted to glance at Trent and his date to verify what I suspect—that he’s the one who requested the tune—but instead, I gaze up at Austin and find him grinning at me.

“Now this I can handle,” he brags.

I snicker and sink back into his arms…

About the Author:

ConnieLSmithConnie L. Smith spends far too much time with her mind wandering in fictional places. She reads too much, likes to bake, and might forever be sad that she doesn’t have fairy wings. And that she can’t swing dance. Her music of choice is severely outdated, and as an adult she’s kind of obsessed with Power Rangers. She has her BA from Northern Kentucky University in Speech Communication and History (she doesn’t totally get the connection either), and is currently working on her MA.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/clsmithbooks
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/conniel0194/
Blog/Main Site: http://clsmithbooks.blogspot.com/
ReadWave: http://www.readwave.com/connie.l.smith/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7257320.Connie_L_Smith

 

The Agent Relationship 101 – Guest Post by E.E. Cooper

May 11, 2015

Today, EE Cooper, author of the upcoming YA thriller VANISHED, talks about the agent-author relationship. 

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It is sometimes said that it’s harder to get an agent than it is to write a book. It certainly can feel that way in the query process.  When an agent finally indicates interest it’s easy to say yes without taking time to pause to determine if this particular agent is the best fit for you.  Is this the person you want as a business partner in your publishing career? It’s important to remember that the agent is not doing you a favor when they offer representation. They are signing you because they believe in your book and believe they can sell it. This is a mutually beneficial relationship.

First, it can be useful to review what an agent can do for you:

  • Submit your work. A good agent is seeking not simply to sell your manuscript, but to sell it to the person/publishing house that is the best fit for you. This means they need to know the editors, their likes and dislikes and working style.
  • Review and negotiate contracts. Publishing contracts are complicated documents. You may feel you’ve been asked to sign over a child in return for some magic beans. And you are often not in the place to negotiate; you’re so thrilled with the idea that someone wants to publish your work it’s possible you would agree to anything. You want someone who knows what to look for and can work with the publisher to get you the best deal possible.
  • Run Interference: Not sure how to handle a revision note? Hate your cover? Wonder why you haven’t heard back from your editor?  Your agent can be your go-to person for trouble shooting problems and allowing you to be neutral Switzerland above the fray.
  • Sounding Board: The most common question you may have is: Is this normal? Your agent can answer the questions you have along the road to publication and talk you down when you freak yourself out. Trust me. You will freak yourself out.  (At least I hope I’m not the only one.)
  • Foreign Rights and Film Sales: Admit it — you want to see your book in French and on the big screen, maybe both — a French movie might be ideal. Your agent is the one who along with a co-agent can promote your book in foreign and film markets and negotiate contracts.
  • Brainstorming/Revisions: Depending on your agent, they may help you pick through new ideas and offer you editorial feedback on early versions of your manuscript. (Not all agents do this. If this is something you want from an agent be sure to discuss this with any potential agents during your selection process.)

Writers are often in awe of agents, especially during the early stages of their career. Agents are not magical creatures.  I’ve had the chance to meet several through various conferences and trips to NYC and I can vouch that they’re human. Often with great senses of humor, an impressive ability to drink whiskey, and always able to make great book recommendations.  They’re great to work with, but they are not superior to you as the writer.

The indomitable agent Janet Reid (Fine Print Literary Management) once told a writer on her blog who was worried about “not wanting to make trouble with her agent” to remember:  “you are not a goddamn beggar at the banquet of publishing.”  There’s a reason I think she’s a smart woman — writer’s could do worse than to read her blog for advice. Too many writers talk to friends and fellow writers about concerns about their agent, or how things are being handled without talking to the person in the best place to answer that question.  While friends and fellow writers might have advice the person who can help you resolve the question is your agent. If you feel uncomfortable talking to them, that’s a problem. This is YOUR career.  No one will care more about your publishing future than you — don’t sit back.

So what do you do if you have questions or problems? Here are some questions you might want to discuss with your agent.

So you’ve signed me as a client; what happens now? And what do you mean you want me to change_______?  (the ending, the opening, a character etc.)

Your agent may have suggested changes to your manuscript before they send it out on submission. This is likely something you will have discussed with them before you agreed to have them represent you.  The most important thing to do is to step back and listen. Why are they suggesting these changes? What do they see as the advantages? If you feel strongly that those changes are not congruent with your vision of the manuscript you need to speak up.  Discuss. If at the end of hearing their reasoning you still don’t feel it is the right choice for you, that’s okay.  You may convince the agent of your view, or you may decide to go separate directions. This isn’t a battle — it’s a discussion.

If this is your first book, one of the best questions you can ask is “now what?” Your agent can walk you through how they will submit your book. What is their approach going to be?  What are your expectations? How will they communicate with you during this process?

 So where are you sending this manuscript? Why aren’t you sending this manuscript to this particular person?

You agent can share with you where she/he plans to submit your manuscript and their reasoning for choosing those editors/houses. I would be reluctant to work with an agent who didn’t want to tell me where my manuscript was going. If for some reason you terminate your relationship with the agent and work with another, the new agent will need to know where your manuscript has gone.  Some agents send any rejections as they come in. Some only provide you with an update when you ask.  Some will forward any emails they get from an editor; others will just give you the summary.  You can ask how they will communicate this news to you and what your preference is.  Keep in mind however, that submissions is your agent’s job- you don’t need to micromanage this process. If you don’t trust that they are doing it correctly then your bigger problem is why is this person your agent?

You may have a particular editor or publishing house that you want your manuscript sent to. Perhaps it is an editor you met at a conference, or a dream house that you want to work with. Tell your agent where you would like it to go and then sit back and listen.  They may agree to send it on or they may feel there is a better editor/house to start with.

Why hasn’t my book sold yet? What’s happening?

While your book may sell within days-it more commonly will likely take longer.  I will warn you now — the waiting sucks.  For me every time the phone rang I thought: “is this it?” every email ping made my heart race.  I suggest that you spend this time working on a new book and/or taking up a hobby to consume your time, such as building perfect scale models of various major cities out of toothpicks.   It is perfectly fine to ask for an update.  This does not need to be done a daily basis.   Ask your agent what is the best way to reach them: phone? Email?  Ask them how long you think it will take to hear back from editors — if they say three weeks, mark it on your calendar and then fill your time until that date passes and then ask for a check in.

Your agent should hear back from editors. I would be concerned if my agent submitted my manuscript and then never heard back.  It would make me question how strong their relationship is with those editors. The submission process can take a long time. Editors often have to get buy-in from others in the house before making an offer. Editors also have piles and piles of work on their desk, which means they may not be able to read your manuscript as quickly as they would like.  Your agent may need to ping them to get an update if it is taking longer than expected.

Why haven’t I heard from you?

What do you do if your agent seems to be missing in action? No word, you’ve sent emails and nothing.  Is it a case of “they are just not that into you?”

First, remember that while this is your only agent, you are not your agent’s only client. It is possible your agent is busy with a tricky deal, at a conference, on vacation (who let them have a personal life?) or dealing with a more pressing issue.  While we all want to be special snowflakes, it’s useful to remember there are many snowflakes.  Agents get busy. They have lives of their own that may involve children, significant others, health issues or moves.  The fact they haven’t reached out may have nothing to do with you.

This is a time to use the phone. Give them a call. Let them know it’s important that you hear back. How much time until you hear back? I think it depends, but a week is certainly reasonable in my opinion.  If you still haven’t heard you may consider contacting the main number of the agency to see if the receptionist knows if the person is out of town.

If you’ve reached out via phone and email and still aren’t hearing back it may be time to reconsider the relationship.

I don’t think you’re the agent for me. How do I fire you?

There may come a time when you realize that you and your agent aren’t working well together. Perhaps they aren’t in touch (see above) or they seem to have different views of where your manuscript should go, or they haven’t followed through on promises. It may be time to end the relationship.

First, consider having one more conversation. Prepare for this talk. Outline what you see as problems in the relationship and have specifics in terms of what behavior you would need to see in order to want to stay.  (I need you to return my emails within a week.  I need you to follow-up on this contract by X date.)  You want to be detailed because is you say something vague such as I want you to be more responsive — you and your agent may have very different ideas of what that looks like.

However, relationships do end. It may be that the relationship can’t continue. It may be sad, but you’ll survive. (And so will the agent.) Make certain you’ve read your agency contract. How do you need to terminate this relationship? Your agent may have a period of time where if they get an offer from a publisher they still retain the deal. You may need to send written notice to the agency. Follow the requirements of your contract.

Remain professional. Publishing is a small business. Many of these people know each other.  Friends are there to bitch to — publicly airing your grievances — not classy. Stay classy.

I think my agent is amazing. How do I be the best client ever, and does it involve sending whiskey/chocolates or both?

Representing your interests is your agent’s job. You do not need to lavish them with gifts for doing their job. Having said that, letting them know you appreciate their hard work and time is never a bad idea.  Send a personal thank you note. At the holidays consider sending a small gift.  I often send knitted things. This isn’t about sending the most expensive gift. It’s about reaching out to thank someone who you enjoy working with.

Most importantly, be a “good” client. What makes a good client?

  • Meet your deadlines and if you can’t, give people as much of a head’s up as possible.
  • Be reasonable in your requests — no one likes a prima donna.
  • Keep the drama on the page when possible. It’s okay to have an occasional meltdown with your agent. However, ask yourself if all you need is a shoulder to cry on — is there someone else who can take on this role?
  • Respond to emails or requests in a timely manner. If you can’t- send a message and let your agent know when you can follow-up.
  • Be professional in public — think before you tweet/Facebook/spout off at a conference. Don’t make others embarrassed that they’re connected to you.

I can vouch that there is nothing better than having a great agent. Knowing there is someone who has your back builds confidence and makes you feel like you finally “have people.”  Writing is an individual creative act, but publishing is a collaborative business.  Having a business partner that pushes you to be the best can’t be beat.

This is where I give a shout out to my agent Barbara Poelle who is so much awesome that I can’t express it without a musical interlude, interpretive dance, and pom-poms.  I am also currently knitting something for her.

 eecoop

EE Cooper’s YA Psychological thriller VANISHED is out May 12, 2015.  The School Library Journal review said: “This novel tackles themes of friendship, deception, obsession, and love….With early hints of John Green’s Paper Towns that slowly morph into Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl .”  A review that made Cooper so happy that she printed it out and rolled around on it.

You can find out more about EE Cooper at http://eecooper.com

Visit her on Twitter!  @eecooperbooks

Here’s a bit about VANISHED:

Gone Girl meets Pretty Little Liars in this fast-paced psychological thriller full of delicious twists and turns.

Friendship. Obsession. Deception. Love.

Kalah knows better than to fall for Beth Taylor . . . but that doesn’t stop her from falling hard and falling fast, heart first into a sea of complications.
Then Beth vanishes. She skips town on her eighteenth birthday, leaving behind a flurry of rumors and a string of broken hearts. Not even Beth’s best friend, Britney, knows where she went. Beth didn’t even tell Kalah good-bye.

One of the rumors links Beth to Britney’s boyfriend, and Kalah doesn’t want to believe the betrayal. But Brit clearly believes it–and before Kalah can sort out the truth, Britney is dead.

When Beth finally reaches out to Kalah in the wake of Brit’s suicide, Kalah wants to trust what Beth tells her. But she’s swiftly realizing that nothing here is as it seems. Kalah’s caught in the middle of a deadly psychological game, and only she can untangle the deceptions and lies to reveal the unthinkable truth.

Add it on Goodreads

Buy it at Indie Bound | B&N | Chapters / Indigo | Amazon

Fiction Friday: Tips from an Editor – Active and Passive Voice in Character Viewpoint #writetips

May 8, 2015

Editor

In today’s Fiction Friday, I’m sharing some advice I got from my editor Rie Langdon, when she was working with me on my book, The Angel Killer. As a writer, I’m always looking for new ways to get deeper into the character’s point of view (sometimes called “Deep Voice”). Rie gave me some great tips on how to use active and passive voice to ensure it’s consistent with the character’s viewpoint. But first, I’m going to explain a little bit about…

Active vs. Passive Voice

In writing, sentences fall into two types of construction: active or passive. If the emphasis centers on the subject, the sentence is considered active. However, if the emphasis is on the object (that the action is being performed upon) then the sentence is passive.

Consider the following:

Active: Many people attended Friday night’s concert.

Passive: Friday night’s concert was attended by many people.

There are many sites out there explaining active and passive voice. As a writer, I’ve learned that active voice is stronger than passive voice, because it gives a greater sense of clarity of who is doing the action. But sometimes, the use of passive voice is helpful. For instance, passive voice can be a way to show a character’s viewpoint.

Passive Voice in Character Viewpoint

When using passive voice, consider the main character’s point of view.

When writing from the point of view of a main character, that main character would primarily use active voice to describe their own actions. They would then use passive voice to describe another person’s movements or actions being done to them. For example:

I ran my palm down the length of her arm as her fingers fiddled with the top button of my shirt.

See how, as the viewpoint character, the main character (the “I” voice) is active (“I ran my arms”) while at the same time the character speaking perceives *her* actions as happening to them, more passively (“her fingers fiddled”).

Generally speaking, the viewpoint character should be the active character within that scene.

In some cases, however, you might accidently include a phrase where the viewpoint character’s actions are described as happening to them, rather than as something they are actively doing. There are times where you want the viewpoint character to be passive in a scene… let’s say the viewpoint character is getting beaten up, for example, and then this is a great time to disembody that character’s actions:

My hands wouldn’t make fists as Karl pummeled me, and my eyes closed.

Now contrast with an active presentation:

I couldn’t make a fist to return Karl’s punches; all I could do was close my eyes.

Both are valid choices, and their difference is stylistic. Having body parts moving on their own only works in a scene where you want to emphasize the POV character’s lack of power in a situation, or if it’s an automatic response (my heartbeat raced in my chest).

Making these small adjustments, you can help convey, in a manner that is both sneaky and elegant, the deep point-of-view of a character within a scene.

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Thanks for reading! I’m always open to suggestions. If any of you know of some other uses for passive voice to convey character viewpoint, please comment below! Thanks!

Strengthen Your Writing: Best Practices for Building a Strong Writing Group

April 14, 2015

strengthen

This summer will be my second anniversary of working with my current writing group. These three authors have been by my side through thick and thin. They’ve helped me edit my second book and get it ready for publication, and they continue to work with me on my third. I’ve come to learn so much from them and value their feedback as much as any editor’s. I’ve also come to truly love reading their work.

Beyond that, though, they have become my friends. They’ve stood by my side at book launches, helped me write book blurbs, been willing to catch my clichés and repeated words, and put eyes on my writing while it’s still naked and swaddled in the loose writing of its infancy stage. They have been doulas and midwives to the birth of any of my writing projects.

For me, as far as strengthening my writing is concerned, a good writing group is worth more than emeralds.

Recently, I attended a session on how to put together a writing group. The session gave us some best practices and then provided an opportunity for people to mingle and potentially connect with future group members.

The best practices were very helpful. I found I’ve followed most of them myself, so I thought I’d share them and include some of my own.

Best practices for starting or finding a writing group:

Know Yourself and What Your Needs Are

At the session, they used the term writing group instead of critique group. My group calls itself both. But you can have a writing group without doing any critiques. It simply depends on what you want to call it and what your group does when they meet. (It’s like a book club can sometimes become a book and wine club!)

The following are questions to ask yourself to assess yourself and your own needs. The more clear you are with yourself, the easier it will be to find what you’re looking for.

  1. What are your goals as a writer?

This can be:

  • the form you’d like to do: short fiction, poetry, novels, or all types.
  • the genre of writing: memoir, non-fiction, fiction: children’s, literary, historical, romance, thrillers, mystery, sci-fi, fantasy, etc.
  • the audiences you’d like to reach: Children’s (picture books through middle grade and young adult fiction), New Adult, Adult.
  • the writing skills you’d like to master: to get stronger in dialog, to get stronger in prose, to master epic iambic pentameter, etc.

It should also include:

  • the word count you’re aiming to write (or one short story or how many poems) and how often you’ll be writing.
  • your publishing goals. (Are you writing for publication under contract? Are you writing for submission to agents and editors in the near future? Is your publication goal more distant? Are you entering writing contests? Are you writing for the pure joy of it and to master the craft?)
  1. What do you hope to get out of a writing (or critique) group?

This would be why you’d like to join a group and what you hope the group can help you with.

  1. Where are you at in your writing process?

  • How often do you write? How much time do you have to contribute to a group and give feedback.
  • List a few of your strengths as well areas you know are weaknesses.
  • List five adjectives to describe yourself as a writer.

Once you know your own strengths…


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Look for Members with Similar Goals and Complementary Strengths

One of the things I’ve found truly works is that the colleagues I work with have similar motivations to mine:

  • we write regularly
  • we’ve been published and are writing professionally to be published again
  • we frequently upgrade our writing skills by attending workshops and courses, or by reading books on craft.

This isn’t how it has to be for everyone. In fact, there are many reasons to join a group. Here are some I’ve heard:

  • to reach out and talk to other writers to feel less alone (definitely a benefit)
  • to set deadlines that would motivate yourself to write
  • to meet and write in cafés (this would be primarily a writing group versus a critique group)
  • to brainstorm ideas, seek friendly advice, and learn more about the craft.

At a session I recently attended, I was the only person in the room who was writing to a publication deadline.

However, someone working to a publication deadline might not be well-suited to work with a newer writer who hasn’t written in over a year and simply wants a group to hold them accountable. The energy of the group may dissipate.

The same might be the case if you mixed children’s picture book writers with writers of erotic fiction. Sometimes, there are cross-over skills, and sometimes not.

Complementary strengths is about finding people who are strong where you are not. In turn, you are strong where they need help. When you find this, it is a gift indeed. In my group, it just happened. We all found ourselves looking at different things, and sharing what we had learned so far on our writing journeys. A synergy happened where we were each inspired to learn more from each other. Somehow, it all worked out but it came from….

Build Trust

In my group, we had an initial meeting where we talked about the kind of feedback we wanted. How we needed to hear both good and bad, and yet, we wanted the truth.

First and foremost, we needed to have each other’s best interests at heart.

The topic of building trust is a big one. Each of us had unpleasant memories from some groups (especially open groups). But we found that agreeing to act from this core belief in helping each other and wanting the best for each other was a good start.

Everyone has different trust levels, so sometimes it’s a good idea to talk it out and find out what each group member needs.

Agree Upon Guidelines

It’s important to decide on some details up front. You don’t have to organize everything, but a few things do best if you’re organized, such as:

  • Where to meet (in person, via Skype, only via email, etc.)
  • When and how often to meet
  • How much to share and how to share it. (Some groups stagger the sharing, others allow everyone to share at each session)

Some groups meet and read aloud their pieces and people critique on the spot. Others, like ours, submit their work ahead of time. As a group, decide on what everyone wants to do, and what works.

For example, our group meets once a month and we would send our pieces to be critiqued four days ahead of time. We set a word limit (guideline) of approximately 2,500 words or a chapter. We mark up each other’s work and share it with each other by speaking to it, versus just sending that marked up document to our colleagues.

Learn How to Communicate with Each Other

This topic is a bit of a wiggly one. We all know how to communicate, right? After all, it’s what we do.

We met in person, so we could read each other’s cues and body language. We soon discovered ways to highlight the things we liked in the piece – sometimes it may take more work. However, if you’re lucky, you’ll find people’s work you love.

Here are some other things to consider:

  • Find out what boundaries exist for group members and how they like to be communicated with.
  • Lead by example: show others how you’d like to be treated (probably with respect and kindness) but also stay open to different communication styles.
  • Be mindful of reactions. Learn to read body language and non-verbal cues.
  • Take time to discuss what is working and what isn’t for the whole group.

Learn How to Give Feedback

I could write an entire post on this and still not cover it, but it’s good to start with a few ground rules:

As the person receiving the feedback:

  • Remember the spirit in which the feedback is offered (they have your best interests at heart!)
  • It is all right to state what kind of feedback you need ahead of time. For example, do you simply need it looked at for story arc, or for character, or do you need a line edit? Etc.
  • Listen to all feedback before responding. Do not be defensive. (This can sometimes vary depending on the personality of the group. A writing group can be like a family; some are well-mannered and formal, whereas others are passionate and animated.)
  • At the end, ask questions for clarification.
  • Everyone sees things differently. It’s okay to filter information. It is your writing, and you can take the feedback or leave it.
  • However, if you have several people stuck on the same area of a piece, it may need work.

As the person giving the feedback:

  • Ask yourself: Is it helpful? Is it kind and from the heart? (I believe things can be truthful and kind)
  • Use “I” language to give your impressions.
  • Ask questions, such as: Why did your main character show up for the event 15 minutes early? What did you mean when you said ____?
  • Look for the positive as well as areas for improvement and sandwich more difficult feedback between possible corrections.
  • Gage the person whose work you’re reviewing. Are they tired or overwhelmed? Vary your feedback accordingly.
  • Remember that it is not your story, so do not be attached to someone taking your feedback.

There you have it, some best practices on writing groups. What are some of yours?

Spring YA Scavenger Hunt: Exclusive Content from @kaimcca93 #YASH #TeamPurple

April 2, 2015

Hello and Welcome to the 10th YA Scavenger Hunt!

YASH INFO

Hello! I am Lisa Voisin, your hostess for this leg of the hunt.

LisaThis is me
(once I’ve had my hair straightened)

I’m a city girl who loves nature and lives beside a temperate rainforest at the base of a mountain.

I love coffee but I have over two dozen different kinds of tea in my cupboard. (It’s a compulsion)

Neil Gaiman is one of my idols.

I love cherry blossoms in the spring.

The Hunt:

This bi-annual event was first organized by author Colleen Houck as a way to give readers a chance to gain access to exclusive bonus material from their favorite authors…and a chance to win some awesome prizes!

On this hunt, you not only get access to exclusive content from each participating YA author, you also get a secret number. Add up the numbers, and enter it for a chance to win a major prize–one lucky winner will receive at least one signed book from each author on my team in the hunt! But play fast: this contest (and all the exclusive bonus material) will only be online until noon Pacific time on Sunday, April 5th!

You can start right here or you can also go to the YA Scavenger Hunt homepage to find out all about the hunt. There are EIGHT contests going on simultaneously, and you can enter one, two or ALL of them! I am a part of TEAM PURPLE–but there is also a blue team, a red team, a green team, a pink team, a gold team, an orange team, and a teal team. If you do those hunts too, you’ll have a chance to win many different sets of signed books!

Team Purple

If you’d like to find out more about the hunt, see links to all the authors participating, see the full list of prizes up for grabs, or if you get lost along the way, go to the YA Scavenger Hunt homepage. Full instructions can be found on the How to Hunt page.

Looking for my exclusive bonus content? You’ll have to keep searching. Somewhere on this blog hop, I’ve hidden an exclusive, never-before-seen scene from Mia and Michael’s past — from the yet to be published sequel to The Angel Killer. ( No spoilers, I promise!)

Before you go on though, check out the amazing author I’m hosting. But, first, a few rules.

scavenger_hunt_2

Directions: Below, you’ll notice that I’ve listed my favorite number. Collect the favorite numbers of all the authors on the green team, and then add them up (don’t worry, you can use a calculator!). Hint: the secret number is highlighted in:

PURPLE

Entry Form: Once you’ve added up all the numbers, make sure you fill out the form here to officially qualify for the grand prize. Only entries that have the correct number will qualify.

Rules: Open internationally. Anyone below the age of 18 should have a parent or guardian’s permission to enter. To be eligible for the grand prize, you must submit the completed entry form by October 5th, at noon Pacific Time. Entries sent without the correct number or without contact information will not be considered.

Now that all the technical stuff is out of the way, I am super excited to be hosting…

 Kai McCarthy

kaimc

Kai’s Story:

Kai is the indie author of “Unpredictable Prophecies” and “Unimaginable Prospects.” Growing up in a small town near Grand Rapids, Michigan, Kai McCarthy started reading at a young age. The only books that drew Kai’s attention were the supernatural ones. She started writing in middle school. UNPREDICTABLE PROPHECIES’ inspiration came from a dream. Kai is currently working on the Fontanei series.

Kai’s Books:

Unpredictable Prophecies (Book One in the World’s End Trilogy)

Unimaginable Prospects (A World’s End novella)

Here’s a bit about UNPREDICTABLE PROPHECIES:

Fallen angel? Try risen demon.

Acadia Mills has been sent to perform very serious tasks. Part of the prophecy that predicts the end of the world, Acadia must figure out how to make it less severe of an outcome. When the only person who can tell her how to do that is mysteriously murdered, Acadia must work with the compelling angel Micah, whose team is also trying to figure it out. Torn between following her guardian’s orders and doing what is right, Acadia finds herself reliving her human life, where she makes a startling discovery.

When everything falls to pieces, can Acadia save the one she loves to find the one she is destined for?

Bonus Content: Prologue to The Magpie’s Daughter

(from Kai’s upcoming Fontanei series – for more information, visit Kai’s shiny new website: http://kai-mccarthy.com/  I visited it THIRTEEN (that’s 13) times.)

Prologue

 People surged through the streets as arrows whizzed over their heads. Panicked crowds rushed in groups to the nearby forest. Men on horses galloped over citizens, slashing their swords at anyone in their way. One woman weaseled her way against the crowd, a screaming child in her arm as another, her son, clung to her hand.

“Mommy,” the boy whined, barely heard over the shouting and screaming, “where are we going? I’m scared.”

Shh, Charles, I know. Mommy’s scared too.” She glanced at all the terrified faces, a sickness settling her gut. Her children came first but she couldn’t take the youngest. She knew only one people well enough to entrust with the baby’s care. Pushing against the walls, the woman clung tight to Charles’ hand as more and more people rushed to the gates.

“Mommy, why aren’t we going with them?” Charles cried, pointing to the crowds. Tears were streaming down his face as he saw children his own age being carried by their parents, heading to somewhere safe. Where was his mother taking him?

“Charles, in here,” his mother ordered, ushering him into a building. It was dark and smelled of mold, but he listened. Once his eyes adjusted, he noticed a woman standing next to a curtain, her dark hair stringy and messy. Her eyes were wild, a bright green seeming to shine through them, as if it wasn’t their natural color. She looked crazy and Charles was petrified.

“Mathilda, I beg you for your help.” The woman with the baby approached the other, kneeling and bowing her head as she offered the bundle of cloth. “This child will only be a burden and I fear she will cost all our lives if I keep her. Charles is old enough to understand and Richard already knows my plan.”

Mathilda shook her head sadly. “How do you expect me to care for her?”

“Please. Do whatever you must. I’ll be back for her when I can. Just keep her safe. Richard was so happy when she was born, I fear it will break his heart if she died at the hands of the Garbonians.”

Charles stepped up to his mother and clutched her skirts. “Mother–“

“Hush, boy,” Mathilda scolded. “Heavens, Elizabeth, did you teach him nothing yet? Where are his manners?” She grabbed the baby and coddled her, pushing back the cloth enough to see her sleeping face. “Fine. I will watch over your daughter as if she is my own. She will know nothing of you, Richard, or Charles. Is that what you want?”

Elizabeth’s heart broke. Her daughter wouldn’t know anything about her? “Is this the only way?”

“If you wish to keep her safe, yes.”

The mother hung her head. “So be it.” She stood, grabbed Charles by the hand once again, and turned away. Tears ran down her face but she knew Mathilda would take care of the baby. “Come along, Charles.” She opened the door and joined the crowd, never once looking back. Charles, however, looked just in time to see Mathilda slip through the curtain, his baby sister still in her arms.

 Chapter One

Hiyah!” The blade sunk into the tree, cutting it through two solid inches. Emmalyn panted with exertion, her body drenched in sweat. Even her hair, usually tied neatly in a bun at the nape of her neck, hung loose, the dark strands clinging to her face.

Clapping sounded from behind her. “Quite impressive, Emmalyn. Perhaps next time you can hack it down with your mind instead.”

Emmalyn turned to see her mother, Mathilda, standing in the doorway to the cottage. She wore black, as usual, the robes hanging to the ground as if wanting to trip her. Her hair, too, was its normal craziness, sticking out at random places and looking as coarse as straw. Emmalyn bowed to her.

“Thank you, Mother. My training has improved much.”

“Indeed. It’s a shame you don’t pay as much attention to your studies. You have a brilliant mind, if only you would choose to utilize it.”

Yanking the sword from the tree, Emmalyn ignored the jibe. She was smart, yes, but schooling would get her nowhere, not while she was a woman. That, and the ‘studies’ she spoke of didn’t interest her at all. She had no need for magic. Mathilda watched her as she wiped the blade down, her keen eyes noticing when Emmalyn sucked in a sharp breath and massaged a part of the sharp metal.

“Is your blade chipped?” she asked the younger woman.

Emmalyn looked up in shock. “Yes, Mother,” she replied after taking a moment to control herself. “I’ll need to repair it later tonight.”

“You will do no such thing,” Mathilda clipped. “There’s a ball this evening and you must look your best. Every eligible young man will be there looking for a suitable woman to make his bride. You must keep to traditions. Your sixteenth birthday has come and passed. It’s time you find a husband.”

“I wish for no husband,” Emmalyn snarled, sheathing the weapon into its case on her hip. “I have no interest in conversing with men who will leave me with child for a war we cannot win.”

Mathilda sighed. “Emmalyn, it is your duty as a woman to attend. You must. Now, you will come into the cottage, bathe the grime from today’s training off your body, and dress in the elegant gown I made for you. No argument.” She turned back into the cottage, the door closing quieter than Emmalyn would have thought possible.

Heaving a sigh to match her mother’s, Emmalyn crossed her arms over her chest and glared at the cottage. She hated getting prettied up for men who only seemed to pretend to be interested in her. With her childbearing hips, every man’s mother was commanding him to introduce himself to Emmalyn at these kinds of events, even before she was of age. She doubted tonight would be any different.

 


Bonus Draw

Thank you so much for visiting my website! While you’re here, don’t forget to enter the bonus draw I am running exclusively during the YA Scavenger Hunt.

For the BONUS draw, do the following (see the Rafflecopter link below):

1. Tweet about this page and help spread the word about the YA Scavenger Hunt!

2. Leave a comment on this blog and answer the following: Which would you prefer: would you rather be able to fly (with your own wings), heal people with your touch, or read other people’s thoughts?

There are other ways to get more points too! Don’t forget to enter them in the: Rafflecopter giveaway

Speaking of hearing other people’s thoughts. I look forward to hearing yours! Have fun!

For this Bonus Contest, I will be giving away ecopies of THE WATCHER, book one of The Watcher Saga and two ecopies of THE ANGEL KILLER.

Once you’ve commented, proceed to the next author in the hunt… drumroll please! NICOLE CONWAY!

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